Corvinus
Corvinus

Seasonal change of oribatid mite communities (Acari, Oribatida) in three different types of microhabitats in an oak forest

Hufnagel, Levente and Gergócs, Veronika and Garamvölgyi , Ágnes and Homoródi, Réka (2011) Seasonal change of oribatid mite communities (Acari, Oribatida) in three different types of microhabitats in an oak forest. Applied Ecology and Environmental Research, 9 (2). pp. 181-195.

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Official URL: http://www.ecology.uni-corvinus.hu


Abstract

Oribatid mites are one of the most abundant groups of the ground-dwelling mesofauna. They can be found in almost every terrestrial habitat all over the world and they are characterized by great species richness and great number of individuals. In spite of that not enough is known about their behaviour on community level and their spatial and temporal pattern in different habitats of the world. In our present study the seasonal behaviour of oribatid mite communities was analysed in three types of microhabitats in a temperate deciduous forest: in leaf litter, soil and moss. Samples were collected at a given site in a year and a half and the oribatid mite communities living there were studied on genus level along with the changes of meteorological factors characteristic of the area. The results show that corresponding to similar previous researches, the communities in our study do not have a seasonally changing, returning pattern either. Based on this, we can conclude that climatic differences and differences in other seasonally changing factors between the seasons do not have a significant role in the annual change of communities. Besides that we discovered that the communities of the three microhabitats are not completely the same. It is the oribatid mite community of the moss which differs mostly from communities in the leaf litter and in the soil. Our study calls attention among others to the fact that compositional changes of the oribatid mite communities living all over the world and their causes are unclear to date.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:oribatid mites, communities, microhabitats, seasonality, temperate deciduous forest
Subjects:Ecology
Funders:Bolyai János Research Scholarship, „ALÖKI” Applied Ecological Research and Forensic Institute Ltd.
Projects:TÁMOP 4.2.1/B-09/1/KMR-2010-0005
ID Code:1476
Deposited By: Z. S.
Deposited On:07 Mar 2014 15:44
Last Modified:07 Mar 2014 15:44

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