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Susceptibility of raspberry cultivars to the raspberry cane midge (Resseliella theobaldi BARNES)

Vétek, Gábor and Fail, József and Pénzes, Béla (2006) Susceptibility of raspberry cultivars to the raspberry cane midge (Resseliella theobaldi BARNES). Journal of Fruit and Ornamental Plant Research, 14 (3 Supp). pp. 61-66.

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Official URL: http://www.insad.pl/files/journal_pdf/Suppl_3_2006/Suppl_3_full_6_2006.pdf


Abstract

During the 2004 growing season, five raspberry cultivars were evaluated in terms of their susceptibility to the raspberry cane midge (Resseliella theobaldi Barnes). The trial was carried out at Berkenye, Nógrád County, Hungary. The cultivars evaluated were ‘Rubaca’ from Germany, ‘Fertődi Zamatos’ from Hungary, ‘Tulameen’ from Canada, and ‘Autumn Bliss’ and ‘Golden Bliss’ from the United Kingdom. Every other week, twenty-five split primocanes of each cultivar were randomly collected for laboratory examination. Data recorded for each cultivar included the mean number of larvae, the mean split length, and the mean extent of bark peeling per primocane. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficients were calculated for the correlations between the annual mean number of larvae per primocane on the one hand, and the annual cumulative mean split length per primocane and annual mean extent of bark peeling per primocane on the other hand. There was a weak correlation between annual mean number of larvae and annual cumulative mean split length, and a stronger correlation between annual mean number of larvae and annual mean extent of bark peeling. Annual mean number of larvae per primocane and annual mean extent of bark peeling per primocane were both highest in ‘Rubaca’, which means that the number of larvae per cane largely depends on the extent of stem peeling, although longitudinal splitting may also play a role. Therefore, cultivars with hardly any bark peeling and few and small longitudinal splits can be presumed to be less susceptible to infestation by the raspberry cane midge. Using these criteria, the least susceptible of the five cultivars evaluated would be ‘Tulameen’ and ‘Fertődi Zamatos’. Further research is needed to confirm this conclusion and to gather data on other factors which affect cultivar choice for new plantations, including winter hardiness, and susceptibility to cane diseases.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:raspberry, cultivar damage, Resseliella theobaldi
Subjects:Plant protection
ID Code:1808
Deposited By: MTMT SWORD
Deposited On:05 Feb 2015 09:16
Last Modified:05 Feb 2015 09:18

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