Corvinus
Corvinus

The Multilateralisation of Soviet Bloc Security: The Hungarian Revolution from an Eastern European Perspective

Crump, Laurien (2016) The Multilateralisation of Soviet Bloc Security: The Hungarian Revolution from an Eastern European Perspective. Corvinus Journal of International Affairs, 1 (3). pp. 13-27.

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Abstract

The Hungarian Revolution is often analysed in a national context or from the angle of Hungarian-Soviet relations. From this perspective, the Eastern European satellites seem mere puppets and the Soviet bloc a monolith. Archival evidence nevertheless shows that the Kremlin actually attempted to build a new kind of international relations after Stalin’s death in 1953, in which the Eastern European leaders would gain more scope for manoeuvre. This attempt at liberalisation even facilitated the uprisings in Hungary in 1956. Avoiding a teleological approach to the Hungarian Revolution, this article argues that the Soviet invasion was neither inevitable, nor wholly unilateral. Khrushchev even sought to legitimise the invasion in bilateral and multilateral consultations. There was a mutual interest in sacrificing Hungary’s sovereignty to safeguard the communist monopoly on power. This multilateralisation of Soviet bloc security is an important explanatory factor in an analysis of the Revolution and its repercussions in Eastern Europe.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:Hungarian Revolution, Warsaw Pact, multilateralisation, sovereignty, international relations, communist monopoly on power
Subjects:International relations
History
ID Code:2527
Deposited By: Ádám Hoffmann
Deposited On:08 Dec 2016 08:42
Last Modified:08 Dec 2016 08:42

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